How much do you trust your agent?

How Much Must You Trust Your Listing Agent? | Keeping Current Matters

You and your family have decided to sell your house. It is now time to choose a real estate professional to help with the process. One of the major attributes this agent must possess is trustworthiness. To what degree do you need to trust them?

You must have enough trust in them that you feel comfortable they will accomplish all four things below:

1. Sell possibly the largest asset your family owns

In many cases, a home is the largest asset a family has. Studies have shown that the equity many families have in their home is the largest percentage of that family’s overall wealth.

2. Set the correct market value on that asset

Pricing is crucial even in the best of markets. You want to get the best price for your home without putting your house at a value that buyers will have little interest.

3. Set the time schedule for the liquidation of that asset

Your family probably has a certain timetable for the sale of your house and the move into your next home. Coordinating the home selling process to meet certain schedules can be tricky.

4. Set a fair fee for the services required to liquidate that asset

You will need to pay a commission to an agent for selling the home and coordinating all elements of the selling transaction including possible future negotiations (ex. with a home inspector or appraiser).

That’s a lot of trust. Make sure you pick a true professional to help with the sale of your home.

Call me today for a no-risk listing appointment and learn why my mission statement is to make sure all my buyers and sellers make educated decisions based on their real estate choices. I will explain the ever-changing real estate market to you in plain english, and be there for you at every step… Let’s get together and discuss your home investment goals today!

413-301-4614 or tedenton109@gmail.com

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HPSI – Home Purchase Sentiment Index released

This is great news! As customer confidence increases Fannie Mae can now measure it and make more accurate predictions on the future strength of the Real Estate Market….

Fannie Mae Introduces Home Purchase Sentiment Index | Keeping Current Matters

Earlier this month, Fannie Mae’s Economic & Strategic Research Group announced the launch of their Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI). The index will distill results from Fannie Mae’s consumer-focused National Housing Survey into a single, monthly, predictive indicator. According to Doug Duncan, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist at Fannie Mae, the goal for the new index is simple:

“The Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index provides the market a single number to track consumer attitudes focused on the housing market. Utilizing our National Housing Survey, the only consumer sentiment survey of its kind focused on housing, the HPSI will offer insights regarding current and future-looking housing market outcomes and will complement existing data sources to inform housing-related analysis.”

Here is a graph of the findings of the HPSI from May 2011 until the current index. A higher number reflects a more positive sentiment from the consumer.

Fannie Mae's Home Purchase Sentiment Index | Keeping Current Matters

According to consumer sentiment, the housing market has made great strides over the last four years.

“Unlike existing general indices of consumer economic sentiment, the HPSI is devoted entirely to housing. The index is constructed from answers to six key NHS questions that solicit Americans’ evaluations of housing market conditions and address topics related to their home purchase decisions. These questions ask consumers whether they think it is a good or bad time to buy or to sell a house, the direction they expect home prices and mortgage interest rates to move, how concerned they are about losing their jobs, and whether their incomes are higher than they were a year earlier.

The Economic & Strategic Research Group expects to release the HPSI at 8:30 a.m., ET on the seventh day of each month or the first business day afterward.” (resource: FannieMae.com)

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